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Frankie's Wining Room

Drinking wine while writing, reading, crafting, and whining

POV Writing Challenge Assignment Week 3

We’re continuing the POV Writing Challenge for another two weeks.

 

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Week 2 showed us how to write in deep POV, using the character’s senses as they use them without barrier words.

This week, we’re going to apply those same lessons to deep 3rd person POV. Deep 3rd person POV shares many, many similarities to 1st person POV, except there’s a single layer of separation shown in the pronoun. “She and he” are used instead of “I” and the reader assumes he or she is not the character–unless they choose to slip into the deep-seated POV the author provides.

In 1st person POV, the reader has no choice. They are that character. The end. Have a lovely day.

In deep 3rd, the reader has a choice. They can remain themselves reading a deeply immersive book. Or they can become the character and live the story through that character’s shoes–or eyes.

 

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Photo owned and copyrighted by Katie Johnson. Photo credit: https://katierenejohnson.com/

Sometime in the next week–so before Sunday–write (2) flash fiction scenes (less than 550 words – Katie, it’s getting shorter!). Describe the picture above using deep 3rd person POV and one of the following people in each post without telling us which one your chose by using any of the descriptor words provided:

  1. A ghost hunter scared of ghosts
  2. A geologist whose senses are mixed up (suffers from Synesthesia)
  3. A kid who is afraid of toys
  4. A clumbsy living doll who creates earthquakes when she falls
  5. A dead mouse that haunts the living who loves cheese instead of brains
  6. A living skeleton who is a boneeater

The girls helped me with this one. LOL!

Send me the links to your blogs either in the comments or via FB so I can put the links up here. Then, as we all complete our flash fiction pieces, go to each blog and comment, answering the following questions.

  1. Which character did you choose?
  2. Was the POV deep and immersive?
  3. What did the Voice tell you that wasn’t directly provided in the story?

Good luck!

Blog Roll:

Frankie’s Wining Room

Katie Rene Johnson

K.S. King

Shannon Writes Things

Corrie Lavina Knight Edits

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POV Writing Challenge Week 2 Post 2

I think 1st person is my favorite POV ever.

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Photo owned and copyrighted by Katie Johnson. Photo credit: https://katierenejohnson.com/

Some days were harder than others, which didn’t say a whole lot. Most days were a challenge. I watched the old man shuffle down the paved walkway. He shuffled past the loving foster home I’d just removed my client from. Just looking at this place. I’d been able to get here, in a good neighborhood, in a good school, in a good home with people who actually cared about her.

I’d still failed. Mary had still ended up with her alcoholic mother and her abusive boyfriend, whom she’d sworn to the judge was no longer in the picture.

As if I believed that. I didn’t, and I was pretty sure the judge didn’t either.

But the law was the law.

Though, how my other client had lost her kids today was beyond me as well. She…Fuck. She worked. She had a good job. She paid her bills–not always on time. She juggled everything life threw at her. Maybe she got a little too excited sometimes. Maybe she didn’t handle everything with extreme maturity yet. She was a young mother. Maturity would come.

But as soon as her parents had shoved their way into the picture, she’d lost ground and a lot of it. The grandparents had temporary custody–for no damned good reason while an alcholic had succeeded in ripping her daughter out of a safe, secure environment.

What the hell was I doing? I didn’t even know anymore.

Blog Roll:

Frankie’s Wining Room

Katie Rene Johnson

K.S. King

Shannon Writes Things

POV Writing Challenge Week 2 Post 1

Here’s my first challenge post. 1st person is kinda easy for me because of Devices of War. I got over any issues I had with this POV in that series, so this was a little fun!

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Photo owned and copyrighted by Katie Johnson. Photo credit: https://katierenejohnson.com/

I’m not going to hide it it. I realize I should. I realize I should be more grateful to have those thundering apes in my life, but I’ve HAD it! I’m at my wit’s end!

The first thing they did was attack the neighbor with a ball. Now, I’m not saying they did it on purpose. He’s an older man, always walks down the street at the same time every day in his trench coat, whether it’s hot as blazes or not. But it’s the way they handled it. They didn’t say, “Excuse me,” or “Sorry, Mr. Henderson,” or anything. They just whacked him in the head with the ball and then ran into traffic to retrieve the fucking ball! 

But, lucky me, they didn’t get run over and Mr. Henderson was able to toddle off on the rest of his walk, though, I gotta say. He wasn’t walking so straight afteward. I probably should have offered to take him to the doctor.

Then, after they nearly murdered our neighbor, they destroyed my indoor garden! With that same fucking ball!

I don’t know what I want to kill more. Them or that damned ball.

But it didn’t end there. Oh, no. It didn’t end there. They then decided to DESTROY THE FUCKING TV. The TV. The…T….V… Their best fucking friend in the entire fucking universerse.

And THEN they got mad at ME for getting mad at THEM for using that bomb of a ball and destroying it.

And then–because that’s not enough, God, no–when I blew my fucking lid, kept from touching them–because God forbid I do that–and grounded them for life, they decided to be mad…at me! 

Because I made them apologize to Mr. Henderson, clean up my fucking garden and replant everything, and we’re not getting another TV until they’ve earned the money to buy it.

Oh…my…FUCKING…GOD!

Why did I ever have kids?

 

Blog Roll:

Frankie’s Wining Room

Katie Rene Johnson

K.S. King

Shannon Writes Things

Corrie Lavina Knight Edits

POV Writing Challenge Assignment Week 2

We’re continuing the POV Writing Challenge for another three weeks.

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In Week 1’s challenge we discovered a few things. First of all, 3rd person omnicient is all but void. We write it, but omnicient only sells in high fantasy, and that genre isn’t a high seller. Very few people buy those books and few read them.

There’s a greater use of deep third and third limited. Of the two, deep third was the hardest.

In deep third, we, the reader, experience everything in the story as it happens. We don’t necessarily need all the physical directions. We don’t need to know that we’re watching someone, for instance. We just see what we’re watching.

In Writing Deep Point of View by Raine Hall, she talks about barrier words and phrases. Those barrier words and phrases are things like:

He watched

She felt

He saw

She thought

He smelled

They’re barriers because we’re telling that we watched, thought, saw, or smelled. Instead of saying those, in deep third, you would just state what you saw, thought, or smelled.

That was the biggest challenge that everyone seemed to have overall.

So, to help face that, we’re going to write in 1st person this week.

I know. We really didn’t touch on it too much in the original assignment post, but 1st person uses “I” instead of “he or she”. That’s the easiest thing.

The thing that will really help in this exercise, though, is that in 1st person, you, the author, are the character. We experience things as the character does and there are no reasons for barrier words.

The other thing we’re going to focus on for the next three weeks is Voice. Voice is how the character talks and narrates. Sometime in the next few months, we’re going to go to downtown–hopefully when the temperature is above zero degrees–and we’re all going to write what we experience the way we perceive it. This will show our own, individual voices.

Rayne Hall has an exercise in her book. She says to go to a window and describe what you see. Then write it as another person. Each person will see different things and will perceive different things. Some people are very visual. Others are very audiocentric. While others are more kenetic or intuitive. People’s pasts also reflect what they pick out and how they perceive things.

My best friend was hit by a car once, so now she’s hyper aware of cars in a cross-walk, for instance. I have another friend who was raped in an alley in broad daylight, so she’s hyper aware of men wearing red–because her attacker wore red. I used to be a smoker and after I quit smoking, I could smell, so smells will pull my attention away from a scene if it sticks out there.

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Photo owned and copyrighted by Katie Johnson. Photo credit: https://katierenejohnson.com/

Sometime in the next week–so before Sunday–write (2) flash fiction scenes (less than 650 words). Describe the picture above using 1st person POV and one of the following people in each post without telling us which one your chose by using any of the descriptor words provided:

  1. The carpenter who is verbally abusive, socially awkward, and afraid of a common situation
  2. The college student who is greedy, judgmental, and egocentric
  3. The nurse who is addicted to adreneline
  4. The lawyer trying to make a difference
  5. The mother seriously considering jail time in exchange for murder
  6. The rock star in search of Big Break

Send me the links to your blogs either in the comments or via FB so I can put the links up here. Then, as we all complete our flash fiction pieces, go to each blog and comment, answering the following questions.

  1. Which character did you choose?
  2. Was the POV deep and immersive?
  3. What did the Voice tell you that wasn’t directly provided in the story?

Good luck!

Blog Roll:

Frankie’s Wining Room

Katie Rene Johnson

K.S. King

Shannon Writes Things

Corrie Lavina Knight Edits

Weekly Word Update

I did great! Until the weekend hit.

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2,739       Wrote on the bus
2,378       Wrote on the bus
2,311        Wrote on the bus
2,061       Wrote on the bus
 0              Sat down to write and discovered the co-author changed the pace, so what I was                  going to write would have had to be re-written. So, opted not to write it.
1,084      Tried to write…but had to re-read what co-author re-wrote
                Need to re-re-read what co-author re-re-wrote…but need a day off. So I’m                           working on classes instead.

One of the things I need to do is TAKE DAYS OFF. Yes. I need to write because I want to be a full-time author, but even my full-time job lets me have three days off a week. So…I need to re-re-think things.

Also, I might be frustrated. I am a write-through-THEN-revise writer, but I find I’m spending my writing time re-re-reading my co-author projects. So instead of needing/carving out one hour to write, I now need three. I barely carved out one. So…I’m going to have to do co-author books…next month? After Christmas? On the weekends? I don’t know. How do you revise-as-you-go authors write a book when you re-read it everytime you touch it? Like…I don’t GET it!

POV Writing Challenge Week 1 Post 3

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Photo owned and copyrighted by Katie Johnson. Photo credit: https://katierenejohnson.com/

Herald rubbed his aching knees and sighed as he stared up at the bridge. He was getting too old to be going on adventures like this. And what would his nurse say when she found him? Well, he would certainly get an earful, he was sure.

But this was worth it. Wasn’t it?

He hobbled over to the railing, admiring the wires that crisscrossed over his head and marveled at the creative genious it took to come up with these designs. At the time, the idea of a bridge like this was impossible. Those inventors were true heros. Herald smiled as a rising sense of wonder filled his chest.

He watched three balloons rise into the air. Somewhere, there was probably a kid upset and a parent trying to figure out how to mollify him. Herald grunted, irritated with the thought. Times had changed. As a kid, he’d seen challenges all around him.

Today, if a kid was challenged, all they had to do was cry and the world changed around him. What kind of world were they crafting?

What kind of world did I help craft? he asked himself. He was, as it were, an adult in this society. His hands had helped create the world around him. Maybe not this bridge. No. But he’d helped shape the people around him.

Like his daughter.

He put his hand to heart, his fingertips digging into his chest as he walked painfully to the railing overlooking the water. He felt the hurt running over him like a freight train. He’d helped shape his daughter, a woman who was so mean and spiteful that she made the world a dark place when she was around. He didn’t even really understand how he’d done it, either. He worked hard, he’d provided for her, shown her how to do things for herself.

But as a woman, she refused to do anything on her own and she shredded the souls of the people closest to her. And she was destroying her son, a boy Herald had tried to help.

And that’s how he’d ended up here. In this city of people where everyone was invisible.

He sighed and looked up at the cloudy, grey sky. Yes. He hoped this walk would be worth something. His soul was heavy. He needed just a shot of life, some spark of it.

He sighed and gripped the railing as tight as his gnarled fingers could. His fuse was spent.

POV Writing Challenge Week 1 Post 2

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Photo owned and copyrighted by Katie Johnson. Photo credit: https://katierenejohnson.com/

The city never slept. It never lulled or hushed or wept. The city remained constant, like a seething pit of refuse filled with rats. And that’s why he’d been called. He could see the city for what it was, could look past the soft veneer of hope some might see symbolized in the form of those three floating balloons slipping past the edge of the bridge.

Take the woman walking toward him for instance. Her suit proclaimed she was educated. Her carefully coiffed hair was like a walking billboard of control. But underneath it all, she was nothing more than a whore’s daughter with a whore’s appetite. She invited men and women to her apartment and took them to heights they never knew with more docile partners. She was passionate fire and sexual brimstone.

But no threat.

Or that boy vandalizing the pedestrian concrete guard with his skateboard. He appeared to be nothing more than a vagabond whose only dream was to poach off of others, but he excelled in math and science and used skateboarding as his vice to alleviate the overwhelming chaos his alcoholic mother inflicted upon him.

Again. No threat.

The woman hustling her daughter along drew his attention. The girl had her head bowed over her phone, ignoring the wind whipping in her face. She had to catch them all, and that’s all she could concentrate on. It was far better than to listen to her mother berate her over the color of her shirt.

The mother, Evelyn, however, was a much different character, and exactly what he was looking for. Calm. Cool. In control. Her eyes shifted around the crowd of people, finding the best, most expedient route through the din.

Calculated. Hard to read.

Threat.

 

POV Writing Challenge Week 1 Post 1

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Photo owned and copyrighted by Katie Johnson. Photo credit: https://katierenejohnson.com/

The city had a certain kind of beat. The pounding of the cement crusher on the corner beat counter to the horns honking at the road construction. The flag high overhead tapped occasionally as the wind added a bell to the orchestral cacophony.

“Ugh.” Mark tripped over the curb, pressing his large hand on the oversized handrail. “I hate the smells of the city.”

Rikki didn’t even notice the smells. His soul was filled with the music.

A woman hailed a taxi on the eighth beat of the measure. A car honked on the second of the next. Mark’s hard-tipped shoe double tapped in a quarter beat on three. And flag rang out on four, all with the ra-ka-ka-ka-ka of the concrete breaker, or whatever the thing was called.

“Dude.” Mark jerked Rikki out of traffic and onto the sidewalk.

The wind of the bumper that almost hit Rikki kissed his bare knees. He hopped behind the pedestrian barrier with a laugh. The music of the city sang to his soul, filling him with energy.

“I thought you said you wanted to see the bridge.” Mark shoved his hands into his blazer and scrunched his shoulders up to his ears, his expression dry with displeasure. His dark hair flopped into his face as the wind whipped it around.

The flag pole rope clanged against the pole again, but Rikki’s attention had been pulled away from the tempo long enough that he wasn’t sure what measure they were even on anymore.

One of the construction workers moved a bright, orange cone and it dropped to the pavement with a countering ba-ba-bump.

Car horn honked at four.

Geeze. The music he could create here. Rikki took his drumsticks out of his pocket and beat them against the concrete barrier as he followed Mark toward the middle of the bridge. This—this was living.

POV Writing Challenge Assignment Week 1

Okay, folks! It’s time for another writing challenge and we’re focusing on POV.

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First of all, POV isn’t just a matter of says, “We’re writing a scene in Bella’s POV,” and then running with it. You’ve got to know how Bella thinks. hat words she would use to describe things. What is she going to pick up? How is she going to refer to certain things, like vehicles, for instance. If you–the writer–is a mechanic, but you’re writing in Bella’s POV who is a teenage girl lusting after a vampire who’s not concentrating on much of anything but his eyes, she’s not going to know anything that’s important about the big red truck that her dad gave her. She’s going to note that it starts and is hard to park. You, the mechanic, would know a lot more, but you need to stash that and use her words and her experience.

That’s an example of Voice in POV and it’s very important and ties into what most people refer to in POV.

There are five different kinds of PoV:

  • 1st person
  • 2nd person
  • 3rd person omniscent
  • 3rd person limited
  • Deep 3rd person

Most writers are good with 1st person. You use the words, “I and me” instead of he and she and he, and you don’t have to use italics when your character is thinking. The biggest thing I notice is that some authors tend to think they have to remain in the character’s thoughts more often, making the read kind of a drain.

We, fiction writers, don’t get a lot of experience writing 2nd person because it’s just awkward. Like, I want to throw up a 2nd person challenge in sometime because we don’t get the opportunity to write it. But we use “you” instead of “I, she, or he.” Basically, we invite the reader into the story with us, and that’s an art, folks. That’s an art. 

But for the purpose of this writing challenge, we’re going concentrate on 3rd person POV’s. Why? Because I get a lot of editors who try to tell me there is not such thing as deep 3rd person POV and to stop writing in a bastardized form of 1st person, and a lot of authors who think they’re writing in deep 3rd, but they’re really writing in 3rd limited or 3rd omnicient.

3rd omniscent is your “god” POV. It’s the POV you use when the narrator is like god and can read every single person in the story. You see this a lot in high fantasy, but not really anywhere else. This was common when I was a kid, but it just isn’t anymore.

3rd limited is where you have, say, two POV’s. You stay in one character’s head, and then you hop on over to another character’s head at the next scene break. You use their eyes, their nose, their knowledge, but you’re still pretty much outside of their head. So, when they think, their thoughts are in italics.

Deep 3rd is basically like 1st person, but in 3rd person, so if you need to lean toward 3rd limited to tell the story, it’s a lot less awkward. Thoughts are not in italics. The writing tends to be a lot more active because you don’t have to tell the reader what he’s thinking. He’s already thinking what the character is. The reader experiences the story as the character does because we are the character.

Okay. First of all, for everyone participating in the challenges, open A Busy Writer’s Guide: Point of View in Fiction by Marcy Kennedy and read Chapters 3 and 6. And read Writing Deep Point of View by Rayne Hall, Chapter 5. We’re actually doing the exercise she lined out in Chapter 1, so, if you want, read that one, too.picture-1

Photo owned and copyrighted by Katie Johnson. Photo credit: https://katierenejohnson.com/

Sometime in the next week–so before Sunday–write (3) flash fiction scenes (less than 750 words). Describe the picture above using one of  the following Points of View with each post without telling us which one your chose by using any of the descriptor words provided:

  1. a 19-year-old female student, art major, currently planning to create a series of paintings of townscapes, keenly aware of colours, and shapes.
  2. A retired health and safety inspector.
  3. A hobby gardener with a keen sense of smell.
  4. A security consultant assessing the place where a high ranking daughter will be visiting.
  5. An architect whose hobby is local history.
  6. An 80-year-old man with painful arthritic knees which get worse in cold weather.
  7. A professional musician with sharp ears and a keen sense of rhythm.

Use only the following types of POV, one for each post:

  1. 3rd person omniscient
  2. 3rd person limited
  3. Deep 3rd person

Send me the links to your blogs either in the comments or via FB so I can put the links up here. Then, as we all complete our flash fiction pieces, go to each blog and comment, answering the following questions.

  1. Which character did you choose?
  2. Which type of POV did you use?
  3. How could you tell?

Good luck!

Blog Roll:

Frankie’s Wining Room

Katie Rene Johnson

K.S. King

Shannon Writes Things

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